Suborned by words

niqa:

Marvel Charades With Captain America’s Anthony Mackie

fidget98160:

miscperson:

infinitenap:

security guards

As a real security guard….I wish this was my job…

can i hire you specifically for this purpose

robertiveanuke:

Another gift for you, Internet.

robertiveanuke:

Another gift for you, Internet.

'Isn't a kind of a trip to know you have your own action figure?' 'It’s pretty dope.’ (c)

brickby-brickby-brick:

"So when Captain America was whoopin’ yo ass!!!"

Funniest interview ever!

<3

hellotailor:

cthonical:

wild-lion:

i think my saddest moment as an Australian was finding out that the rest of the world doesn’t say “never eat soggy weetbix” to figure out the order of the compass

how even does the rest of the world remember this

"never eat shredded wheat" rhymes better. (that’s the british version afaik.)

"never eat sour watermelon" is the U.S. version. tbh the Aussie one is better. 

blinkingkills:

johnleavittlives:

If Will really wants to hurt Hannibal he shouldn’t turn a gun on him, he should fuck with his herb planters.

Just start wordlessly tipping them over

“I understand you’re upset Will, please”

*crash*

“we can talk about this.”

*crash*

“Just come here and don’t do anything-“

*crash*

“NOT THE OPAL BASIL.”

shatter all the wine bottles

septembriseur:

I am so here for CA:TWS stories that examine the fact that Sam is at a different point in his life than Steve is, that even though we get to see Sam as a goofy, exuberant flyboy, he’s also someone who has crossed a river that Steve has only come to the bank of: stepping outside of his soldierness and confronting how to live in the world with what he’s lost and what he’s done. The scene at the VA suggests that Steve comes to him in search of a guide as well as a friend. Sure, Steve’s seen and done things that Sam can’t imagine, but Sam has also done one important thing that Steve is only starting to imagine, which is making peace with himself as a soldier and a human being. 

It’s pretty interesting that Sam is essentially a happy character, generous and trusting, and that he has no problems going back into battle, bringing the battle to his home. We know that he’s suffered a lot, enough to make him lose all sense of purpose. But when we see him, he’s not suffering. Unlike most of the MCU heroes at this point, he’s not in the thick of warring with his trauma. And while there are a lot of pointed questions you can ask about the politics of his character, I think it’s important that he’s there in the film to show that there is a peace to make with trauma. That it’s possible to suffer, and not suffer for the rest of your life; that it is actually possible to come out the other side of grief.

But also: that it’s not some magical transformation, that it doesn’t happen through love or by chance. I feel like we get a really clear sense of a Sam who has worked incredibly hard to be the person he is. We see him leading a recovery group! It’s like: Yeah. He’s been through this. And it’s like the opposite of grimdarkness, because what it’s putting up there on the screen is the idea that trauma is real, and major, and crippling, and it’s not going to just go away— but you can live through it, live with it, and learn to be a happy human being.

And that’s one of the reasons Sam is awesome. And there should be more stories about that.

beringandwellscrew:

rmlfvr:

These classical musicians play their instruments in a way you’ve never seen before.

A rather compelling visual experience, on top of being a flawless musical demonstration, performed by Salut Salon, a charming German quartet from Hamburg. 

WOW!!!!
Just WOW!!!

If you’re going to perform inception, you need imagination